On September 14, 2-3.30pm ET, Roulston Research is hosting a healthcare roundtable with Carol Harding, Senior Director for Supply Chain Innovations and Organizational Transformation, Cleveland Clinic, Former Vice President of Reimbursement, Edwards LifeSciences, and Bill Greenfield, Managing Partner at Novation Healthcare Solutions, Former Regional Vice-President at HCA.

Speakers will discuss EMR/EHR vendors and adoption, Revenue Cycle Management companies and the competitive landscape, Clinical Decision Making vendors and software for achieving cost effective, high quality care, healthcare reimbursement under the healthcare reform model, Group Purchasing Organizations and the competitive landscape, the future of outpatient centers, and Radiation Therapy companies and the competitive space.  Athenahealth, Allscripts, HCA, Unitedhealth, Wellpoint, Universal Health Services, Aetna, McKesson, Humana, AmerisourceBergen, Cardinal Health, Community Health Systems and other names will be discussed.

September 14, 2:00-3:30 pm ET at BTIG, 825 Third Avenue, 6th Floor (50th and 3rd)

Carol Harding, Senior Director for Supply Chain Innovations and Organizational Transformation, Cleveland Clinic, Former Vice President of Reimbursement, Edwards LifeSciences

In her role as the senior director for supply chain innovations and organizational transfromation at Cleveland Clinic, Carol is responsible for project oversight for organizational transformation, an enterprise-wide cost savings initiative, and for building a business analytics capability for the supply chain.  She is also focused on aligning the supply chain with medical operations. Prior to joining the Cleveland Clinic in 2010, Harding was in the medical device industry for 12 years. Most recently, she was vice president for global reimbursement and health economics for Edwards Lifesciences. She also spent nearly 10 years with Johnson & Johnson.

Bill Greenfield, Managing Partner at Novation Healthcare Solutions, Former Regional Vice-President at HCA

Bill Greenfield is currently Managing Partner at Novation Healthcare Solutions, where he specializes in Hospital Strategy, Revenue Cycle Management, Healthcare IT, and Supply Chain Management.   In his capacity as the Managing Partner, Bill advises 150 healthcare-focused venture capital firms.   Prior to his work at Healthcare Business Management Services, Mr. Greenfield was the CEO of Physician Practices at Iasis Healthcare, a national for-profit hospital system. Prior to Iasis, Bill was the Regional Vice-President at HCA. Prior to HCA, Bill was the Vice-President, Physician Practice Operations and Development at Medcath.

To reserve your seat to the event please contact info@roulstonresearch.com.

Roulston Research is hosting a retail roundtable on September 12, 2-3.30pm ET with former senior executives from Neiman Marcus/Sears and Ross Stores/Macy’s.

Companies that will be discussed include JC Penney, Gap, Nordstrom, Ross Stores, TJX Companies, Macy’s, Kohl’s, Sears, Saks, Target, Urban Outfitters, Chico’s, Ralph Lauren, Tiffany and Coach among others.

September 12, 2:00-3:30 PM ET at BTIG, 825 Third Avenue, 6th Floor (50th and 3rd)

Steve Dennis, Former SVP Strategy and Marketing, Neiman Marcus, Former Vice President Multichannel Integration and Development, Sears, Roebuck and Company, President, Sageberry Consulting

Steven Dennis is President and Founder of SageBerry Consulting, a boutique consulting firm specializing in growth and marketing strategy for retail, luxury, and fashion brands. Prior to SageBerry, Mr. Dennis was Senior Vice President of Strategy and Marketing for The Neiman Marcus Group where he was responsible for strategic business development and corporate marketing (customer insight, enterprise marketing programs, and loyalty program strategy), and led the company’s partnership to operate its credit card business. Prior to joining Neiman’s, he was with Sears in a number of senior leadership roles including Chief Strategy Officer and Leader of the Lands’ End Integration Team. Mr. Dennis’s expertise spans all major retail and e-commerce product categories and formats. He has extensive experience in leveraging consumer insight to drive growth initiatives through organic growth, new concept development, and acquisitions.

Barry Gluck, Former Executive Vice President of Merchandising, Marketing and Store Planning and Allocation, Ross Stores, Former Vice President, Macy’s, Managing Director, Gluck Consulting

During his tenure at Ross Stores, Mr. Gluck successfully managed and developed planning, procurement and sales, increasing profitability for Men’s, Young Men’s, Children’s, Lingerie, Accessories, Cosmetics and Family Footwear divisions. Barry left Ross Stores to form his own consulting firm Gluck Consulting. Prior to Ross, Mr. Gluck served as General Merchandising Manager and Vice President for Today’s Man. Prior to Today’s Man, he served as Vice President and Divisional Merchandising Manager, Men’s, Young Men’s, Children’s and Luggage at Macy’s Atlanta.

To reserve your seat to the event please contact info@roulstonresearch.com

The $1B+ win by Apple will now be used as a precedent against any of the other Android licensees in the US and likely be used as a core factor in the ITC decision to block Android products in the US. This should not only improve Apple’s competitive position (effectively they will now profit from every conforming Android product sold going forward) but it will make Microsoft a far better source for a competitive license than Google is (Microsoft can protect through cross license against similar Apple moves). In addition the Windows 8/RT tablets and phones coming to market will have less Android competition as well. RIM will miss this opportunity in sales, their new platform won’t show up until after the holidays, but they are suddenly an acquisition target because Google/Samsung need their patents and Apple/Microsoft won’t want this to happen. RIM could find itself to be the hottest date at the prom. To read the full article please visit http://www.digitaltrends.com/apple/apple-is-victorious-android-is-screwed-both-rim-and-microsoft-may-be-grateful/#comment-457757.

 

Rob Enderle is President and Principal Analyst of the Enderle Group, a forward looking emerging technology advisory firm. He specializes in providing rapid perspectives and suggested tactics and strategies to a large number of clients dealing with rapidly changing global events.

HP recently released its quarterly financials and as expected they were not pretty. On the positive side networking and software posted ten and eighteen percent revenue growth respectively. While most of the hardware businesses were showing slight declines, the two areas hitting double-digit declines were PCs and consumer printers. Oracle really did a number on HP’s high-end, Itanium-based servers and while HP won the litigation against Oracle — and that this compensation should be impressively high given this damage — it will also take a while to arrive and even longer to apply to fix the problem. Any material change here is likely a year or more out. Those of us that have been through a few of these, and in my case the IBM turnaround is burned into my brain, realize that the first few years are ugly. There are typically huge swings, layoffs, and the resulting inability to execute over the short term. Competitors line up and pound on the weakest link and the company in a turnaround is that link. HP had the extra special annoyance of having a CEO become a problem and then turn traitor combining with an ex-close partner in what has to be the most expensive corporate divorce for cause in history. You can see some parallels in life with this last because Sun played the role of the tramp in the Oracle/HP divorce. For some reason the market has never seemed to understand that it takes at least 5 years (even for Steve Jobs) to pull something like this off and that the first years are the most difficult, especially if your predecessor gutted the company. To read the full article please visit http://www.itbusinessedge.com/blogs/unfiltered-opinion/turning-around-hp-year-one-four-to-go.html.

 

Rob Enderle is President and Principal Analyst of the Enderle Group, a forward looking emerging technology advisory firm. He specializes in providing rapid perspectives and suggested tactics and strategies to a large number of clients dealing with rapidly changing global events.

Until Amazon–and a handful of other pure-play concepts–emerged as power-house brands, a retail growth strategy largely consisted of two major components: build bigger stores and create a bigger retail footprint.

Whether you were Walmart, Office Depot, Coach or Lowe’s, your strategy was mostly about pushing the limits of market dominance: expanding your assortments to cover every related purchase occasion and expanding locations to cover every trade area perceived to be viable.

Then digital happened, and if a large part of your product offering could be delivered without the need of a physical location (think Best Buy, Blockbuster or Borders–and that’s just the “B’s”) this has proved to be a big problem indeed.

And show-rooming happened, and if you were in categories where the consumer likes the research service found in a brick and mortar location, but ultimately buys on price, you were losing a lot of business to direct-to-consumer players not burdened by your overhead structure.

Then there’s the emergence of omni-channel retailing, and if you aren’t making it frictionless for your customer to shop anytime, anywhere, anyway, you were losing share to those who have truly embraced customer-centric retailing.

Last, but not least, the recession happened, and many of the consumers you were counting on–you know, the ones that had become weapons of massive consumption fueled by easy credit–suddenly pulled back big time, and many of the locations you opened in the last five years or so are dead in the water.

So for most, it’s time to shrink.

Fewer, more productive stores. New, smaller formats that resonate more strongly with today’s blended channel realities and that can work in different kinds of trade areas.

But if you think getting smaller is just about physical space, think again.

When you think smaller, think more intimate. Become more personalized, more intensely relevant. Treat different customers differently.

In the future the customer shouldn’t walk away from interacting with your brand thinking that you have down-sized. They should feel that you know them, you get them and that your brand was built with them at the center of all that you do. To read the full article please visit http://stevenpdennis.wordpress.com/.

Steven Dennis is President and Founder of SageBerry Consulting, a boutique consulting firm specializing in growth and marketing strategy for retail, luxury, and fashion brands. Prior to SageBerry, Mr. Dennis was Senior Vice President of Strategy and Marketing for The Neiman Marcus Group where he was responsible for strategic business development and corporate marketing (customer insight, enterprise marketing programs, and loyalty program strategy), and led the company’s partnership to operate its credit card business. Prior to joining Neiman’s, he was with Sears in a number of senior leadership roles including, Acting Chief Strategy Officer and Leader of the Lands’ End Integration Team. Mr. Dennis’s expertise spans all major retail and e-commerce product categories and formats. Steve will be participating in our Retail Roundtable on September 12th in New York at 2 PM Eastern. If you are interested in attending please email info@roulstonresearch.com.

This week Aetna announced that they have acquired Coventry Health Care for $5.7 billion in cash and stock. Aetna is paying a 20 percent premium and the acquisition will make them one of the largest providers of government-financed healthcare. This move comes after several other highly visible acquisitions by healthcare insurers adding Medicare and Medicaid insurance providers. WellPoint recently agreed to buy Amerigroup in a deal that will make the combined firm the largest private Medicaid company by membership and last year Cigna purchased HealthSpring to increase their Medicare exposure. Randy Vogenberg believes, “The Aetna acquisition was clearly a play due to health care reform market trends being anticipated post 2014.  Since it will take 12-24 months to digest Coventry into Aetna operations, the timing makes sense to effectively spread their mix of business risk sooner than later post SCOTUS decision and most likely scenarios around results from the Congressional and Presidential election cycle in 2012.”

 

Randy Vogenberg is principal at the Institute for Integrated Healthcare which offers health care and employer based benefits strategic consulting, value based benefit plans and design, pharmaceutical, diagnostic & device industry training, advising on managed customer linkages, and health policy and applied economic issues analyses for benefit design solution opportunities in the health care marketplace. He also principal of Bentelligence which provides a 360 degree view of benefits advisors, health plans and employer plan sponsors. It is a web based market intelligence tool and expert support for all stakeholders in healthcare.

The United States is experiencing one of its worst droughts in a half-century and it is being made worse by federal policy artificially increasing the cost of corn and other food. The root cause of the problem is the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), originally passed in 2005 and expanded in 2007 through the Energy Independence and Security Act. That act requires that 13.2 billion gallons of corn-based biofuel (ethanol) be produced in 2012, consuming 40% of the nations corn supply. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is predicting the smallest corn crop in 6 years largely due to drought. Even the United Nations has called upon the United States to ease the use of mandated ethanol so that more of the corn crop could be channeled toward food and feed uses. On the Chicago Board of trade, corn futures recently traded for about $8 a bushel, up from about $5.20 in June. Since 2005, corn prices have more than tripled, mostly because of the renewable fuel standard. The U.S. government can help food and livestock feed prices during this drought by issuing a waiver that reduces the ethanol mandate, but so far, the EPA has not indicated a willingness to do so. The United States is now the largest exporter of ethanol in the world surpassing Brazil. Since the United States is the world’s largest exporter of corn, it is likely that price spikes will ripple through not only U.S. markets, but globally as well. To read the full article please visit http://www.instituteforenergyresearch.org/2012/08/16/drought-and-renewable-fuel-standard-driving-up-consumer-costs/.

Thomas J. Pyle is the president of the Institute for Energy Research (IER). In this capacity, Pyle brings a unique backdrop of public and private sector experience to help manage IER’s Washington, DC-based staff and operations. He also helps to develop the organization’s free market policy positions and implement education efforts with respect to key energy stakeholders, including policymakers, federal agency representatives, industry leaders, consumer entities and the media. To read more about the Institute for Energy Research and their mission please visit http://www.instituteforenergyresearch.org/.